Blog-Kategorie
Modern Workplace

Hier bloggen sepago Experten über: Modern Workplace

| |

Microsoft ConfigMgr 2012 – Client Log Files

A lot of things changed with the coming of ConfigMgr2012 (for now it’s in the state of RC1). Loads of people already wrote articles about what cool new features and goodies came with ConfigMgr2012, I instead want to have a closer look on troubleshooting, as I am in the middle of a RC1 deployment at a customer’s site.

Log Files

If you’ve already worked with System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 2007,

| |

Servergespeicherte Profile mit dem Profile Migrator 2.0 migrieren

Die Migration servergespeicherter Profile ist – wie schon von der Version 1.1 des Profile Migrator gewohnt – in drei einfachen Schritten realisierbar.

Als Erstes wählen wir die zu migrierenden Quellprofile aus. Das kann über Organisationseinheiten des Active Dirctory, über Verzeichnisse, über Netzwerkfreigaben oder durch die manuelle Eingabe des Pfades geschehen

Jetzt kann die Basis der neuen Profile wahlweise über ein Musterprofil ermittelt werden, oder durch die Angabe das Pfades zu einem Default Profile.

| |

Fixing Office 2007’s Quick Access Toolbars With Citrix User Profile Manager

Not sure where user profile management might be useful? Here is an example that should apply to almost everyone. The obvious new user interface feature of Microsoft Office 2007 is the ribbon. But there are numerous other UI enhancements over Office 2003. One of these are the Quick Access Toolbars. If you are not sure what I am talking about: the following screen shot should give you an idea (from a German version of Office,

| |

Mandatory Profiles – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

A mandatory profile is a special type of roaming profile. As with a roaming profile, a mandatory profile is copied from its network location to the local machine during logon. But during logoff, changes are not copied back. Instead, the local copy of the mandatory profile is reset to its initial state at the next logon. In essence, mandatory profiles are read-only roaming profiles. This has advantages, but also severe drawbacks. The Good Since mandatory profiles are read-only,

| |

Deleting User Profiles – Correctly

Commenter Steven asked in response to my article on how not to delete local user profiles for the correct way to script the deletion of user profiles. Here is how. For completeness sake I start with the manual method.

Deleting Profiles Manually

  1. Open the control panel applet „System Properties“ and navigate to the tab „Advanced“. I know of the following shortcuts for this often needed dialog box:
    • Press Win+Break
    • Press Win+R to open the run dialog box.
| |

Deleting a Local User Profile – Not as easy as one Might Assume

In many environments it is a common practice to delete user profiles prior to conducting tests in order to start with a clean slate. However, this may prove more difficult than anticipated.

Most people think that a local user profile only consists of the directory %USERPROFILE% typically located below C:\Users on Vista and Server 2008 (and newer). But there is more. Windows keeps track of the local profile incarnations in the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList.

| |

Why is (Almost) Everybody Wrong About HKU\.Default?

Most technical folks have stumbled across the registry hive HKEY_USERS\.Defaultat some point. Many of them think they know what it is used for. Interestingly, most who do are wrong. The misconception about what HKU\.Default is used for dates back to the good old days when Windows NT 4.0 was still considered „new technology“. This misconception has been, and still is, passed on to future generations by means of books, magazine articles, blog entries and geek talk.

| |

Soup Up Your Terminal Server: Optimizing Explorer’s Network Performance

Update: The ADM file can now be downloaded here.

I recently came across a post in the Windows Server Performance Team’s blog that lists several registry values which can be used to tune Explorer’s SMB performance by modifying the following:

  • Searches for Desktop.ini files used for folder customization
  • Periodic refreshes of folder contents
  • Searches for supporting library (.dll) files
  • Individual file details and attributes pulled for each file
  • Thumbnail extraction

I found the tips very interesting,

| |

Programmatically Determining Terminal Server Mode on Windows Server 2008

A question on the terminal services newsgroup brought this topic to my attention: how can be determined programmatically if a Windows Server 2008 system is a terminal server and whether it runs in application server or remote administration mode? With Windows Server 2008 „terminal server“ is a role that can be installed with the GUI tool Server Manager. If the role „terminal server“ is installed then the system runs in application server mode. If not,